History Curriculum

Download the History - Intent, Implementation, Impact v2 CS

Intent

 

Educating for Wisdom, Knowledge and Skills To help grow resourceful, resilient and reflective children who are equipped with the skills, knowledge and tenacity empower themselves, their learning throughout their lives.
Educating for Hope and Aspiration To inspire and enrich lives beyond current opportunities and experiences in order to open minds to the potential their future holds
Educating for Community and Living Well Together To be a multi-cultural, inclusive community of individuals loved by God who feel valued and involved where we create qualities of character to enable people to flourish.
Educating for Dignity and Respect That children might know how much that they are loved and valued by so that they might show dignity and respect for themselves and others by carefully and safely thinking through their actions.

At Jennett’s Park we believe that a well-rounded History curriculum will allow children to gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of the past in Britain and the wider world. We have carefully designed our History curriculum so that children gain and build on this knowledge as they progress through the school. In addition to this, we recognise the important role that History plays in preparing our children with skills that they can use for life, raising their aspirations, understand how to be a good and responsible citizen, understanding change and societal development and a context in which to understand themselves and others. This is extremely important for children at Jennett’s Park in opening doors for our learners to access a much wider world.

 

Through our History curriculum, we strive to inspire pupils’ curiosity and to know more about the past. Our curriculum provides children with opportunities to ask perceptive questions, think critically, weigh evidence, sift arguments, and develop perspective and judgement. Through the teaching of History, we endeavour to teach our learners to understand the complexity of people’s lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time. We believe that teaching History in this way is important in broadening children's horizons, challenging preconceived ideas and developing life skills in order to prepare them for life after Primary School.

 

Implementation – Whole School History Long term Plans

Year 1
KS1 Objectives Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Topic focus     Toys Transport Pirates  
Develop an awareness of the past     To know that toys have changed over time To know that we are looking beyond living memory, 1896 onwards To know when Blackbeard and Anne Bonny lived (1700s) and how long ago it was.  
Use common words and phrases relating to the passing of time - new, old etc     To talk about parents’ and grandparents’ toys as old in comparison to their own To talk about key transport as old, recent, new and future To talk about Blackbeard and Anne Bonny living a long time ago  
Use a wide vocabulary of every day historical terms - before, after, past, present     To use this vocabulary to discuss toys played with by family members To describe the time focus as before parents and grandparents To know that when they were alive the world was very different to today  
Know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework     To place toys researched on a simple timeline with their birth on it To place these events on a timeline with other Y1 historical focus events To know that this time period was before grandparents  
Ask and answer questions     To ask questions to family members on the toys they had when young To ask and answer questions about transport changes from the invention of the car 1896 To ask and answer simple questions to understand what life was like for pirates in this time period.  
Use stories and other sources to show they know and understand key features of events     To use primary sources such as photos and interviews to answer questions. To use primary sources to understand the significance of transport such as Eurotunnel To understand that stories and films aren’t  always a good historical source.  
Identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods     To identify toy changes and similarities from parents and grandparents time. To explain how transport changes affected life for British citizens    

 

Year 2
KS1 Objectives Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Topic focus The Great Fire of London   Who lives in a castle? Dinosaurs   Under the Sea
Develop an awareness of the past To know that London didn't always look like it does now or have as many people living in it   To know that Kings and Queens of England change and to know when Henry VIII reigned. To know that dinosaurs and Mary Anning (born 1799) were alive a long time ago and how long ago it was    
Use common words and phrases relating to the passing of time - new, old etc To compare using pictoral representations of London that are old and new   To know that Henry VIII reigned a long time ago (1509-47) and know how long ago it was. To know that dinosaurs and Mary Anning were alive a long time ago    
Use a wide vocabulary of every day historical terms - before, after, past, present To sequence the events leading up to the fire and significant changes to construction in London since then.   To know that Queen Elizabeth II is currently Queen and to name royalty from the past and future To know that dinosaurs roamed and Mary Anning was born long before grandparents were.    
Know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework To describe where the events fit on a timeline compared to other key events in British history (and those from previous years)   To place when Henry VIII and our current Queen reigned on a timeline with other historical events To place these events on a timeline with other historical events    
Ask and answer questions To ask and answer questions about the fire services at the time of The Great Fire of London   To ask and answer questions about castle defences To ask and answer questions on how we know about dinosaurs    
Use stories and other sources to show they know and understand key features of events To know how diarists such as Pepys have contributed to our knowledge of key features of events   To name a range of primary and secondary sources To know that fossils can be a source of information    
Identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods To name a range of reliable sources of information about the Fire and explain how they help us understand   To identify differences between the reign of Henry VIII and our Queen today. To describe how we are finding our about the past, compared to how Mary Anning was finding out about the past (fossils).    

 

Year 3
KS2 Objectives Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Topic focus The Robots are Coming

 

Changes in Technology since 1930

Through the Wardrobe

 

The Stone Age

 

Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

Light and Dark

 

Vikings and Dragons

 

Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots.

Under the Canopy

 

Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of local, British & World history To know when the emergence of computers/robots began in relation to other events that were happening at that time   To build understanding of a Jennett’s Park comparison from now and then

 

To describe where the Stone Age and Iron Age are on a timeline. To compare them to other world civilisations at the time

  To describe where the Anglo -Saxons fit on a timeline and who was living in Britain when they first invaded. To explain how, when and why the Anglo-Saxons, Picts and Scots invaded Britain  
Know and understand how people’s lives and world events have shaped Britain To compare what life was like for people growing up in the 1980’s compared to today   To know how developments in food, clothes and homes in the Bronze Age influenced history in Britain   To describe how Anglo-Saxon society was organised   and everyday life in Britain (including governance and conflict)  
Establish clear narratives within and across the periods they study To know that we haven't always had the technology used today   To describe the journey of the Bronze Age and compare what life was like for people living before and after the Bronze Age   To know why the Romans left Britain and how this allowed other groups to invade from other parts of Europe  
Address and devise historically valid questions about change, cause/consequence, similarity/difference and significance. To ask and answer questions about how technology changed the world and whether it was for the better or worse       To ask and answer questions about The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor.  
Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources and how evidence is used including contrasting arguments, To use a range of primary and secondary sources to identify key events that supported changes in technology   To explain how we use primary sources (e.g. tools, cave paintings, jewellery, weapons etc.) to develop our understanding of the Bronze Age as well as discoveries that changed our understanding   To understand the contribution of archaeology to our understanding of the past and identify objects discovered.  
Note connections, contrasts and trends over time using appropriate historical terms To know that advances in technology have moved quickly and are still evolving daily.   To explain connections over time using the terms settlement, farmers, archaeology, agriculture etc   To explain the difference between invader and settler, and draw connections and contrasts between life for people in the stone age and during Anglo-Saxon times  
Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of historical information To name primary and secondary sources and begin to understand that the internet is not always a reliable source of information   To use evidence to construct a response to the following question: ‘How have advances in the Bronze Age affected our life today?’   To use learning and evidence to answer the following question: How did the invasion of the Anglo-Saxons create such tensions in Great Britain?  

 

Year 4
KS2 Objectives Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Topic focus Eruptions!  Where in the World Are We? Twenty Drachma a Day What have the Romans ever done for us? Magic We are Champions
Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of local, British & World history   To know when and where important geographical explorations occurred.  To consider the part of British explorers in the race to the top of Everest. To know where and when the Ancient Greek civilisation existed and order significant events from this period on a timeline. Compare to other global historical events of the time To describe a range of historically significant and reliable sources of evidence of life in Britain during roman times (including written evidence) and the validity of the evidence, introducing viewpoint    
Know and understand how people’s lives and world events have shaped Britain   To understand the importance of British involvement in world exploration both past and present (including space exploration) To know about the Greek Empire and its impact on the wider world, including Britain (e.g. language, maths, art etc.) To describe the Roman occupation of Britain using the terms empire, civilisation, invaders, colony, government etc    
Establish clear narratives within and across the periods they study   To explain how exploration helped shape Britain today thinking about colonisation, the Commonwealth and our current place in the world including space exploration To explain in brief the emergence, development and conclusion of the Greek empire and how it fits in with other global empires To describe the story of how the Roman empire changed Britain and what the pros and cons were for people already living in Britain and then growing up in Roman Britain    
Address and devise historically valid questions about change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance.   To ask and answer questions about how exploration changed the world and the consequences of colonisation.

 

To discuss what there is left to explore (oceans)

To ask and answer more complex questions about what caused the development of the Ancient Greek culture, the global consequences of its emergence and the significance of key differences such as writings, and myths and legends To ask and answer historical questions about how the Romans changed Britain for the people who already lived there and the significance of those changes on daily life    
Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources and how evidence is used including contrasting arguments, claims and interpretations   To compare different accounts of explorations.

 

To consider evidence sources and their reliability.

To compare a range of texts that help us to picture life in the past. To know which types of evidence sources are the most important to our knowledge To describe a range of historically significant and reliable sources of evidence of life in Britain during roman times (including written evidence) and the validity of the evidence, introducing viewpoint    
Note connections, contrasts and trends over time using appropriate historical terms   To know the names and voyages of key explorers (Columbus, Cook, Armstrong, Hillary)

 

To know about the Greek Empire and how it was established and maintained, and how it compares to previous early civilisations studied (e.g. Ancient Egypt/ Ancient Rome) To describe the Roman occupation of Britain using the terms empire, civilisation, invaders, colony, government etc.    
Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information   To use a range of evidence to compare the attempts to reach the summit of Everest, considering the improvements for climber today have improved the challenges involved. To use a range of reliable historical evidence to explain how the academic achievements of the ancient Greeks influenced the modern western world To be able to debate whether the invasion of Britain by the Romans was beneficial for Britain or not, using a range of evidence to support your argument    

 

 

 

 

Year 5
KS2 Objectives Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Topic focus Space WW1 Ancient Egypt
Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of local, British & World history To know when, why and how the Space Race began and who was involved.

 

 

To know when and why WW1 started and the locations of the countries involved To describe the difference between ancient and modern, locating ancient Egypt in time and place and e, noting other significant global civilisations of the era
Know and understand how people’s lives and world events have shaped Britain Look at the representation and importance of women in the space race and how their roles progressed- Hidden figures- and how this affected women’s roles in this industry.

 

To discuss why men signed up to the army in World War One- what did they believe? What were they told- linking to propagandas in later objective? To examine how Egyptian relics were discovered and the significance of Howard Carter and Joanne Fletcher on our knowledge and understanding of the Egyptian civilisation

 

Establish clear narratives within and across the periods they study To describe the key events in the space race (eBooks created on each key event by groups of chn) To describe the significance of some of the major events in the lead up to and within WW1- such as The shooting of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand and The Christmas Truce. To examine key events during the ancient Egyptian period- such as King Tut’s reign, Cleopatra and when these happened

 

Address and devise historically valid questions about change, cause/consequence, similarity/difference and significance. To ask and answer historical questions about the Space Race and key events. To ask and answer complex questions about the conditions of the trenches and the lives of soldiers in WW1 To ask and answer complex questions regarding the accomplishments of key Egyptian inventions and the impact on our life today.
Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources and how evidence is used including contrasting arguments, To examine a range of historically significant sources of evidence of key events of the Space Race and the validity of the evidence: e.g. videos of Neil Armstrong in space, photos from the satellites, newspaper reports etc. Primary and secondary sources and how these are reliable. To look at the power of propaganda from varying countries and how this affects what people believe and view about the war: E.G. Germany’s propaganda to Britain’s. To explore a variety of ancient Egyptian artefacts and explain what they can tell us about everyday life in ancient Egypt- discuss how some Tombs have hieroglyphs scratched off- so they cannot be remembered.
Note connections, contrasts and trends over time using appropriate historical terms To know and correctly use the terms used to describe the Space Race: Satellites, orbit, NACA, NASA, ISS, Hubble Space Telescope, Soviet Union (and how Russia has changed names etc) To know and correctly use the terms used to describe the historical events of WW1, including invasion, occupation, propaganda, alliance, allied, treaty To know and correctly use the terms used to describe ancient Egyptian life:

Sarcophagus, mummification, tombs, pyramids, shaduf, relics, hieroglyphs, high priest/ess, canopic jars

Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of historical information Why the space race was important and what they believe to be the most important event in the Space Race, and why. To discuss what life was like as a soldier in WW1, using evidence and research to organise thoughts. To explain whether it should be legal or illegal to excavate tombs and the scientific and emotional / historical developments that arise from this.

 

Year 6
KS2 Objectives Term 1 Term 2 Term 3 Term 4 Term 5 Term 6
Topic focus Who were the Mayans? Why become a spy? How is Victorian life different to today? Humans in 1000 years Is there anything left to find? Should Olympics be banned?
Continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of local, British & World history To know when early civilisations appeared including the Mayans and place key events on a timeline using the terminology BC and AD, explaining why it goes backwards. What calendar did they use?

 

 

  To know where and why the cities expanded during Victorian times. including Reading’s development locally.

To be able to place key events on their historical timeline that is developing through primary school.

  To know when a further early civilisations appeared  the Shang Dynasty and place key events on a timeline using the terminology BC and AD, explaining why it goes backwards and making comparisons with the Maya civilisation from Term 1  

 

 

 

Know and understand how people’s lives and world events have shaped Britain To explain the impact of the Mayan civilisation on the wider world   To know and understand the impact of Queen Victoria on the development of Britain and how certain key elements (such as industrialisation) contributed to this on a local and national scale – link to pepper moths covered in science in Term 1   To explain the impact of the Shang Dynasty on the wider world

Use double bubbles/venn diagrams to make comparisons between Maya and Shang influences on the world today.

 
Establish clear narratives within and across the periods they study To describe the events of the Mayan Civilisation, including the periods before and after   To explain the story of the development of Britain’s industrialisation what life and entertainment was like during that period – link with WildBoy class text   To ask and answer complex questions about the significance of technological advances during the Shang Dynasty

 

 
Address and devise historically valid questions about change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance. To ask and answer complex questions about the significance of civilised culture during the Mayan dynasty   To ask and answer more complex questions about city changes during the Victorian period of industrialisation compared to now. Consider north/south divides   To examine the accomplishments of Maya civilisations with those of the Shang Dynasty

 

 
Understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources and how evidence is used including contrasting arguments, claims and interpretations To compare the evidence available for the Mayan civilisation to that which is available for other early civilisations, and discuss the validity of the sources.   To compare a range of sources of evidence (including maps, photos etc.) of the local area that contributes to our understanding of what life was like for people at this time   To build an overview of where & when the earliest civilisations appeared & their achievements

 

 
Note connections, contrasts and trends over time using appropriate historical terms To discuss how the Maya relate to other early civilisations (Ancient Egypt studied in Year 5) and analyse trends over time (who, when, where, advances etc.)   To know the contrast in daily life in Reading compared to now.   How did the technological achievements of the Shang Dynasty compare to those of Maya times.  
Construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information To use reliable information to argue which would be better to live in, the Mayan Civilisation or Ancient Egypt   To use reliable historical evidence to discuss the contrast between life before and after industrialisation   To compare the evidence available for the Shang Dynasty to that which is available for other early civilisations (Maya), and discuss the validity of the sources.

To use reliable information to argue which would be better to live in, the Shang Dynasty or the Maya Times

 

 

Impact

Through high quality first teaching of History at Jennett’s Park we will see the impact of the subject in different ways.

 

  • Through pupil voice children will be able to talk about the skills and knowledge they have acquired.
  • Children will be engaged in History lessons and want to find out more.
  • Children will complete research independently through projects and homework and to further their own enjoyment about the subject or topic.
  • Work will show that a range of topics is being covered, cross curricular links are made where possible and differentiated work set as appropriate.
  • The school environment will be history rich through displays, resources, vocabulary etc.
  • As historians, children will learn lessons from history to influence the decisions they make in their lives in the future.
  • Assessments and monitoring will show standards in History will be high and will match standards in other subject areas.

 

Key skills

Chronological Understanding Range & depth of historical context Interpretations of history

 

Historical enquiry
Describing visuals

Sequencing

Timelines –understand and gain knowledge from, create own, use to distinguish comparisons

Historical dates and terms, e.g. AD, BC

‘Timeness of time’ – how different societal eras run in parallel-can children discuss this?

Present knowledge and understanding in a variety of ways

Language of time and the past

The difference between primary and secondary sources

Not all sources are created equally – ascertain value and importance of a source

Topic-specific themes, e.g. empire

Topic-specific terms, e.g. ‘long boat’

Identify key features or aspects of eras or people studied

Examine causes and effects of key events and people

Understanding that not everyone in the time studied will share the same experience

Empathy

Analyse similarities and differences

Make links between different areas studied

Compare

Consider why a source shares its information

Create nuanced opinions, reasoning why people in the past acted how they did.

Compare events from different sources

Check accuracy of interpretations- fact or fiction and opinion

Confidently research topics, independently

Quality questioning to gather information

Use primary resources, magazines, books, personal accounts, the wider library and Internet for research.

Use evidence to build up a picture of a past event or individual

Choose relevant material to build a picture of life in the past

Create nuanced opinions, reasoning why people in the past acted how they did or why an event or change occurred.

Direct independent investigations

Consider different ways to present findings